How to Create the Ideal Study Space for your Teens

Homework becomes part of the daily routine when the kids go back to school, and it can often be a stressful time of day for many families. Many teens, as well as their parents, dread this part of the day. Even though you can’t avoid the struggles related to homework—an unrealistic objective with teens—you can minimize them by creating an inviting study space. This way, your child will have an easier time getting his or her work done.

 

 

 

As you probably already know, a young person’s needs vary from one person to the next. However, you can be inspired with these tips to create the perfect study space with your teen.

 

Pick out a Small Desk to do Homework

First, start by choosing a small desk to do homework. This desk can be in your teen’s room, or it can be in any room that provides a calm ambiance to do homework.

Whether your child needs supervision, prefers to work in a shared living space, or your teen’s room is simply too small, you can set up a small, inviting desk in the living room as a solution. If you have an office, you can even make space in that room for your teen’s desk.

 

 

Some desks take up little room and can blend into a living space. For example, this desk can be made smaller when not being used by sliding the work surface over top of the lateral filing cabinet, which brings the desk’s size down from 192 cm (75.5”) to 104 cm (41”).

 

Give your Teen the Option to Work Standing Up

Some kids aren’t fans of sitting still. It’s a challenge to get them to sit down again to do their homework especially after a long day of sitting down in class. If this is the case with your youngster, you can avoid this problem altogether by giving your child the option to study in the position that he or she wants—like standing up for example.

 

 

There are sit/stand desks that can be adjusted to work sitting down or standing up. These desks are a bit more expensive, but they are worthwhile if they can motivate kids to do their homework without the struggle.

 

Take Away Distractions

When we really don’t feel like doing something, we find distractions. That’s why it’s important to minimize distractions as much as possible in your teen’s study space. Whether it’s with a privacy panel, in a separate room, or a quiet corner, these are all possible options to consider to create a small, secluded workspace.

 

With its vibrant red tack board, this workstation can help your child concentrate on homework.

 

Keep Necessary Supplies On Hand

Some kids are very organized and bring home what they need from school to do their homework. On the other hand, some kids don’t pay attention or “forget” to bring home their school supplies to avoid doing their homework. For those kids, keep extra supplies in their desk at home, such as pencils, erasers, paper, and tablet charger to name a few.

By having school supplies within reach, your teen will be able to get to work much easier and, at the same time, develop good work habits rather than giving in to procrastination.

 

In most cases, a pencil holder can be used to keep the supplies on your child’s desk. However, a small filing cabinet or mobile pedestal can be useful if he or she needs more storage space.

 

Get your Teen Involved in the Creation Process

Involving teens in the creation of their own study space is one way to give them a sense of independence. Establish criteria that you are comfortable with, such as the budget or choice of furniture, and ask your teen to help you with the task.

Depending on what works best for you, you can choose the style of the desk, but allow your child to pick out the colour and decorations to make the space more appealing. This will give your teenager the chance to make this space his or her own, and increase the chances that your teen will make use of this space.

 

 

 

Essentially, the ideal study space should meet your teen’s needs. Place the desk in an area that best suits his or her preferences and level of independence. It should also be placed where he or she can concentrate. If he or she prefers not to sit, give your child the option to work standing up with a sit/stand desk. Lastly, try to minimize the distractions at your teen’s disposal by having school supplies on hand, and, most importantly, make sure your youngster feels comfortable in his or her little study space.

For more ways to reinvent your interior design, visit:

4 Simple Ways to  Liven Up Your Workspace

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